Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/68491
Title: Placental infection of hepatitis B virus among Thai pregnant women: Clinical risk factors and its association with fetal infection
Authors: Sirinart Sirilert
Pattara Khamrin
Kattareeya Kumthip
Rungnapa Malasao
Niwat Maneekarn
Theera Tongsong
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Feb-2020
Abstract: © 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objectives: To identify the risk factors of placental and fetal infections among HBsAg-positive women. Methods: A prospective cohort study involving HBsAg-positive pregnant women was conducted. Maternal risk factors, including serum HBeAg status, anti-HBcIgM, and HBV-DNA levels, were determined. Placental infection was identified by PCR and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Fetal infection was defined as a positive umbilical cord blood HBV-DNA at birth. Results: A total of 96 HBsAg-positive women were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of placental infection was high (44 of 96; 45.8%) among HBsAg-positive women. The major risk factors for placental infection were high maternal viral load and the presence of HBeAg. Fetal infection was detected in one quarter of HBsAg-positive women (25 of 95; 25.3%). The risk of fetal infection was strongly associated with placental infection (78.3%), high maternal viral load, and the presence of HBeAg. There was no significant difference in perinatal outcomes between the groups with and without placental infection. Data on rates of chronic HBV infection in infants after fetal infection were not available. Conclusion: A significant association between maternal measures of viral replication and placental and fetal infection was demonstrated. These findings suggest that transplacental infection prior to birth may be a mechanism contributing to the higher rates of newborn prophylaxis failure in women with a high viral load.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85077162694&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/68491
ISSN: 10970223
01973851
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in CMUIR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.