Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/62509
Title: Potential anti-mutagenicity, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory capacities of the extract from perilla seed meal
Authors: Orada Chumphukam
Komsak Pintha
Chakkrit Khanaree
Teera Chewonarin
Wittaya Chaiwangyen
Payungsak Tantipaiboonwong
Maitree Suttajit
Orawan Khantamat
Keywords: Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2018
Abstract: © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro bioactivities associated with the content of phytochemicals in the extracts from perilla seed meal extract (PSME) compared with dietary seed (PSE). PSE had higher total phenolics and flavonoids content than PSME. However, hydrophilic phytochemical contents in PSME were quantitatively equivalent to PSE. Rosmarinic acid was predominantly found in both extracts. Cell viability and anti-mutagenicity testing demonstrated that PSE and PSME were biosecured and non-genotoxic. Both extracts strongly scavenged free radicals and significantly reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The extracts drastically diminished nitric oxide (NO) production of LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells via iNOS mRNA expression. The expression of IL-6 and COX-2 were evidently inhibited by these extracts. It could be concluded that PSE and PSME clearly showed in vitro anti-mutagenicity, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities. In particular, the by-product perilla seed meal could be considered as a high nutritive functional food. Practical applications: This study suggests that the seed meals, a by-product from seed oil industry, can be utilized as a valuable dietary source for humans and animals. The high content of polyphenols and their bioactivities can be developed as functional foods, and excipients and fillers in pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals production. Moreover, recycling of the by-product seed meals should also reduce environmental and sanitary pollution.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85046435035&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/62509
ISSN: 17454514
01458884
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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