Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/45931
Title: กิจกรรมการดำเนินชีวิตและความสุขของผู้ป่วยจิตเภทในภาคเหนือของประเทศไทย
Other Titles: Occupations and Happiness of Patients with Schizophrenia in Northern Thai Region
Authors: เมธิศา พงษ์ศักดิ์ศรี
วิไลวรรณ มณีจักร สโนว์
วิไลวรรณ จงรักษ์สัตย์
ชลันดา เดชะ
Keywords: จิตเภท
ผู้ป่วยจิตเภท
การดำเนินชีวิต
Issue Date: Aug-2557
Publisher: เชียงใหม่ : บัณฑิตวิทยาลัย มหาวิทยาลัยเชียงใหม่
Abstract: The purpose of this descriptive research was to classified characteristics of schizophrenic patients’ occupational performances in terms of competences in and satisfaction with occupational performances (Activity of daily living, Work and Leisure), levels of happiness and their personal data. The participants were 80 schizophrenic patients with age range between 20-60 years, receiving occupational therapy program in Suan-Prung psychiatric hospital during May - August 2012.They were selected by purposive sampling. Two assessment tools were used in this study: The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure in Thai version, and the Thai Happiness Indicator. Data was analyzed by using descriptive statistic and Hierarchical cluster analysis technique. The results showed 3 clusters of participants as follows: Group 1 included 63 participants whose average happiness scores was 25.52 with standard deviation (SD) of 5.56, and 49.2 % were in lower than average. Their average scores and SD of Activity of daily living, Work or Productive activity, and Leisure were 8.64, 1.90; 8.44, 1.89, and 8.76, 2.23 respectively. Moreover, those of their satisfaction with Activity of daily living, Work or Productive activity, and Leisure were 8.71, 1.92; 8.59, 2.12, and 8.84, 1.92 respectively. In addition, most of them were males with paranoid schizophrenia, age average of 38.45 and hospital admission average of 5.64, Buddhist, single, day laborers; had incomes less than 5,000 Bahts per month, physical diseases, no caregivers, and graduated high school. Group 2 included 16 participants whose average happiness scores was 21.50 with SD of 5.09, and 81.3 % were in lower than average. Their average scores and SD of Activity of daily living, Work or Productive activity, and Leisure were 6.43, 1.91; 4.98, 1.97,and 6.38, 2.03 respectively. Moreover, those of their satisfaction with Activity of daily living, Work or Productive activity, and Leisure were 6.32, 2.15; 5.22, 2.23, and 6.56, 1.98 respectively. In addition, most of them were males with paranoid schizophrenia, age average of 36.18 and hospital admission average of 4.25, Buddhist, single, self -employ; had incomes less than 5,000 Bahts per month, physical diseases, no caregivers, and graduated high school. Group 3 included only one 30 year old male with paranoid schizophrenia whose average happiness scores was 39.00 or in higher than average. His average scores of Activity of daily living, Work or Productive activity, and Leisure were 5.58, 5.92 and 10.00 respectively. Moreover, those of his satisfaction with Activity of daily living, Work or Productive activity, and Leisure were 7.83, 6.54 and 7.50 respectively. In addition, he was Buddhist, single, uneducated, admitted in hospital 5 times and unemployed; had no caregivers and had incomes less than 5,000 Bahts. It was found that patients who had higher scores in competences in and satisfaction with occupational performance had higher happiness scores. Therefore, occupational therapists should encourage patients to develop increase competences in and satisfaction with occupational performance. Thus, the patients may look forward to increase level of happiness.
URI: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/45931
Appears in Collections:AMS: Theses

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
ABSTRACT.pdfABSTRACT289.34 kBAdobe PDFView/Open    Request a copy
APPENDIX.pdfAPPENDIX435.61 kBAdobe PDFView/Open    Request a copy
CHAPTER 1.pdfCHAPTER 1281.32 kBAdobe PDFView/Open    Request a copy
CHAPTER 2.pdfCHAPTER 2419.03 kBAdobe PDFView/Open    Request a copy
CHAPTER 3.pdfCHAPTER 3321.08 kBAdobe PDFView/Open    Request a copy
CHAPTER 4.pdfCHAPTER 4384.78 kBAdobe PDFView/Open    Request a copy
CHAPTER 5.pdfCHAPTER 5288.08 kBAdobe PDFView/Open    Request a copy
CONTENT.pdfCONTENT251.65 kBAdobe PDFView/Open    Request a copy
COVER.pdfCOVER644.06 kBAdobe PDFView/Open    Request a copy
REFERENCE.pdfREFERENCE315.79 kBAdobe PDFView/Open    Request a copy


Items in CMUIR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.