Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/71729
Title: Cognitive impairment is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of elderly population
Authors: Nattayaporn Apaijai
Sirawit Sriwichaiin
Arintaya Phrommintikul
Thidarat Jaiwongkam
Sasiwan Kerdphoo
Sirintorn Chansirikarnjana
Nisakron Thongmung
Usanee Mahantassanapong
Prin Vathesatogkit
Chagriya Kitiyakara
Piyamitr Sritara
Nipon Chattipakorn
Siriporn C. Chattipakorn
Keywords: Multidisciplinary
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2020
Abstract: © 2020, The Author(s). Cognitive impairment is commonly found in the elderly population. Evidence suggests that mitochondrial function in lymphocytes are potential biomarkers in the progression of neurodegeneration, as peripheral mitochondrial function is associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the elderly population. Therefore, we hypothesize that impaired mitochondrial ATP production and oxidative stress in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are associated with cognitive impairment in the elderly population. Data were collected from 897 participants from the EGAT (The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand) cohort. The participants were classified to be in the normal cognition group (n = 428) or mild cognitive impairment group (n = 469), according to their MoCA score. The association of mitochondrial function and cognitive status was analyzed by binary logistic regression analysis. MCI participants had higher age, systolic blood pressure, waist/hip ratio, and lower plasma high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, when compared to the normal cognition group. In addition, estimated glomerular filtration rate were lower in the MCI group than those in the normal cognition group. Collectively, MCI is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in PBMCs as indicated by decreasing mitochondrial ATP production, increasing proton leak, and oxidative stress, in the elderly population, independently of the possible confounding factors in this study.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85097267524&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/71729
ISSN: 20452322
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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