Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/71001
Title: Health behaviors and health-related quality of life among buddhist monks with metabolic syndrome
Authors: Vipada Srimantayamas
Warunee Fongkaew
Benjamas Suksatit
Patcharaporn Aree
Natapong Kosachunhanun
Keywords: Nursing
Issue Date: 1-Apr-2020
Abstract: © 2020, Thailand Nursing and Midwifery Council. All rights reserved. Metabolic syndrome is a major health concern among Thai monks. However, little is known about health behaviors and health-related quality of life among Thai monks with metabolic syndrome. This study 1) examined the health behaviors and health-related quality of life among Thai monks with metabolic syndrome, and 2) predicting factors of health-related quality of life, including health behaviors, and monks’ characteristics. Two hundred and sixty monks with metabolic syndrome who visited outpatient clinics at a large university hospital in the north of Thailand participated in the study. Four research instruments, a demographic data form, case record form, health behavior questionnaire, and the SF-36 Thai version were employed for data collection. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Simple and multivariate logistic regressions were also used to estimate the odds ratio of good health-related quality of life. The findings demonstrated that the total health behaviors score was at the fair level while healthy diet, physical activities, adherence to medication and follow up were at the good level. In multivariate analysis, age, location of monastery, healthy diet, and physical activities were statistically significant predictors of health-related quality of life among monks with metabolic syndrome. Of those four predictors, only healthy diet and physical activities can be modified. Nursing interventions targeting on improving health behaviors, especially for diet and physical activities, are important to improve health-related quality of life among Thai monks with metabolic syndrome.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85082477573&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/71001
ISSN: 19068107
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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