Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/68198
Title: Simultaneous differential detection of canine blood parasites: Multiplex high-resolution melting analysis (mHRM)
Authors: Kittisak Buddhachat
Tirawit Meerod
Waranee Pradit
Puntita Siengdee
Siriwadee Chomdej
Korakot Nganvongpanit
Keywords: Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Immunology and Microbiology
Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2020
Abstract: © 2020 Elsevier GmbH Recently, the incidence of canine infection by the tick-borne parasites Babesia spp., Hepatozoon canis, Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys has been increasing globally. We have developed a multiplex high-resolution melting analysis (mHRM) technique to reduce the time demands and costs associated with detecting haemoparasites in canine blood, while increasing the degree of reliability of this method of analysis. We have designed primers that are specific for protozoans (B. vogeli and H. canis) and Rickettsia-like bacteria (E. canis and A. platys) based on the 18S or 16S rDNA sequences, respectively. Two primer pairs (Protz18S-C and Bact16S-A) were found to be suitable for detecting these agents since their melting temperatures (Tm) exhibited discernible differences among the four haemoparasites, A. platys, B. vogeli, E. canis and H. canis (83.10 °C, 82.41 °C, 80.37 °C and 78.56 °C, respectively). The sequences acquired from these PCR products were >94 % identical to those of A. platys, B. vogeli, E. canis and H. canis in GenBank. The limit of detection (LOD) for B. vogeli, E. canis and A. platys was 103 copies/μl, while the LOD for H. canis was 104 copies/μl. Of the 68 dogs tested, 28 (41 %) were infected with these agents. The most commonly occurring infection involved E. canis, followed by B. vogeli, A. platys and H. canis, with infection percentages of 26 %, 13 %, 7 % and 6 %, respectively. These results demonstrate that mHRM can serve as a rapid, economical and reliable tool for the detection of parasitic diseases in canine blood for diagnosis and epidemiology.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85077646634&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/68198
ISSN: 18779603
1877959X
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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