Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/66608
Title: A Novel GNAS Mutation Causing Isolated Infantile Cushing's Syndrome
Authors: Prapai Dejkhamron
Chupong Ittiwut
Hataitip Tangngam
Kanokkarn Sunkonkit
Rungrote Natesirinilkul
Kanya Suphapeetiporn
Vorasuk Shotelersuk
Keywords: Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2019
Abstract: © 2019 S. Karger AG, Basel. Copyright: All rights reserved. Infantile Cushing's syndrome is potentially found as part of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) which is caused by postzygotic somatic mutations of the GNAS gene. MAS is typically characterized by a triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin pigmentation, and precocious puberty or other endocrine hyperfunction. Here, we describe a 2-month-old female infant with features of Cushing's syndrome without café au lait spots, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, and clinical evidence of other endocrine hyperfunction. Investigations demonstrated adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome with bilateral adrenal gland enlargement. Whole-exome sequencing of leukocytes identified a de novo heterozygous novel missense mutation (c.521G>A, p.Cys174Tyr) in the GNAS gene. The patient experienced clinical improvement of Cushing's syndrome during ketoconazole treatment. Her clinical course was complicated by Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. She also had shortened activated partial thromboplastin time indicating a hypercoagulable state and resulting in pulmonary embolism. She eventually manifested gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty at the age of 13 months after ketoco-nazole was discontinued. This patient demonstrated that Cushing syndrome can be the presenting sign of MAS in infancy. A high index of suspicion followed by genetic analysis is essential in order to establish a diagnosis.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85070508112&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/66608
ISSN: 16632826
16632818
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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