Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/65647
Title: Proteomes of the female salivary glands of Simulium nigrogilvum and Simulium nodosum, the main human-biting black flies in Thailand
Authors: Chayanit Hempolchom
Onrapak Reamtong
Nitat Sookrung
Wichai Srisuka
Yuwaporn Sakolvaree
Wanpen Chaicumpa
Kritsana Taai
Watcharatip Dedkhad
Narissara Jariyapan
Hiroyuki Takaoka
Atiporn Saeung
Keywords: Immunology and Microbiology
Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Jun-2019
Abstract: © 2019 Elsevier B.V. Although several studies have reported pharmacological and immunological activity, as well as the role of black flies in transmitting pathogens to vertebrate hosts through salivary glands (SG) during blood feeding, SG proteomes of the anthropophilic black flies in Thailand have never been reported. Therefore, this study determined the SG proteomes of female S. nigrogilvum and S. nodosum. Sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and two-dimensional (2-DE) gels containing separated SG proteins of individual species were subjected to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) and an orthologous protein search from eukaryotic organism, nematocera and simuliidae databases for total protein identification. SDS-PAGE and protein staining revealed at least 13 and 9 major protein bands in the SGs of female S. nigrogilvum and S. nodosum, respectively, as well as several minor ones. The 2-DE demonstrated a total of 56 and 41 protein spots for S. nigrogilvum and S. nodosum, respectively. Most of the proteins obtained in both species were enzymes involved in blood feeding, including proteases, apyrases, hyaluronidases, aminopeptidase and elastase. The results obtained in this study provided a new body of knowledge for a better understanding on the role of salivary gland proteins in these black fly species in Thailand.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85063620071&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/65647
ISSN: 18736254
0001706X
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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