Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/62856
Title: Parenting, culture, and the development of externalizing behaviors from age 7 to 14 in nine countries
Authors: Jennifer E. Lansford
Jennifer Godwin
Marc H. Bornstein
Lei Chang
Kirby Deater-Deckard
Laura Di Giunta
Kenneth A. Dodge
Patrick S. Malone
Paul Oburu
Concetta Pastorelli
Ann T. Skinner
Emma Sorbring
Laurence Steinberg
Sombat Tapanya
Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado
Liane Peña Alampay
Suha M. Al-Hassan
Dario Bacchini
Keywords: Medicine
Psychology
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2018
Abstract: Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018. Using multilevel models, we examined mother-, father-, and child-reported (N = 1,336 families) externalizing behavior problem trajectories from age 7 to 14 in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States). The intercept and slope of children's externalizing behavior trajectories varied both across individuals within culture and across cultures, and the variance was larger at the individual level than at the culture level. Mothers' and children's endorsement of aggression as well as mothers' authoritarian attitudes predicted higher age 8 intercepts of child externalizing behaviors. Furthermore, prediction from individual-level endorsement of aggression and authoritarian attitudes to more child externalizing behaviors was augmented by prediction from cultural-level endorsement of aggression and authoritarian attitudes, respectively. Cultures in which father-reported endorsement of aggression was higher and both mother- and father-reported authoritarian attitudes were higher also reported more child externalizing behavior problems at age 8. Among fathers, greater attributions regarding uncontrollable success in caregiving situations were associated with steeper declines in externalizing over time. Understanding cultural-level as well as individual-level correlates of children's externalizing behavior offers potential insights into prevention and intervention efforts that can be more effectively targeted at individual children and parents as well as targeted at changing cultural norms that increase the risk of children's and adolescents' externalizing behavior.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85052727225&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/62856
ISSN: 14692198
09545794
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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