Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/58607
Title: Dynamic Irrigation Promotes Apical Papilla Cell Attachment in an Ex Vivo Immature Root Canal Model
Authors: Sanupong Prompreecha
Thanapat Sastraruji
Phumisak Louwakul
Tanida Srisuwan
Keywords: Dentistry
Issue Date: 1-May-2018
Abstract: © 2018 American Association of Endodontists Introduction: The use of dentin preconditioning techniques in regenerative endodontic procedures is currently promising. Several growth factors have been detected on dentin after ultrasonic irrigation with EDTA. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dynamic irrigation with different solution regimens on apical papilla cell (APC) attachment in an ex vivo immature tooth model. Methods: Various dynamic irrigation techniques, needle irrigation (NI), NI with EndoActivator, and NI with passive ultrasonic irrigation, were used with different solution regimens, normal saline solution (NSS), EDTA, and chlorhexidine digluconate followed by EDTA, in enlarged root canal models where calcium hydroxide–medicated dentin slices were inserted. The initial number of attached fibronectin-positive APCs was counted. Dentin surface morphology was also inspected by using scanning electron microscopy. Results: The number of APCs was significantly greater in the dynamic irrigation groups than in the control group (P < .001). Greater APC numbers were observed in the groups in which NSS was used than in those in which EDTA or chlorhexidine digluconate/EDTA was used, when using the same techniques (P < .001). Cell numbers were similar at all levels of the root canals; however, in the ultrasonically supplemented group irrigated with NSS, the number of attached cells was significantly increased at the middle and apical levels (P < .05). Conclusions: The use of dynamic irrigation techniques in an immature tooth model definitely promoted APC attachment to calcium hydroxide–medicated dentin. Furthermore, when NSS was used as a final irrigant, the number of attached cells was significantly increased.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85043512479&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/58607
ISSN: 00992399
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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