Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/56631
Title: Scanning electron microscopy of antennal sensilla of the eight Anopheles species of the Hyrcanus Group (Diptera: Culicidae) in Thailand
Authors: Chayanit Hempolchom
Thippawan Yasanga
Adulsak Wijit
Kritsana Taai
Watcharatip Dedkhad
Wichai Srisuka
Sorawat Thongsahuan
Yasushi Otsuka
Hiroyuki Takaoka
Atiporn Saeung
Keywords: Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Immunology and Microbiology
Medicine
Veterinary
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2017
Abstract: © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Antennal sensilla were first investigated in the eight medically and veterinary important Anopheles mosquito species (Anopheles argyropus, Anopheles crawfordi, Anopheles nigerrimus, Anopheles nitidus, Anopheles paraliae (= Anopheles lesteri), Anopheles peditaeniatus, Anopheles pursati, and Anopheles sinensis) of the Hyrcanus Group in Thailand, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Four types of sensilla, including sensilla chaetica (large and small), sensilla trichodea (sharp- and blunt-tipped), sensilla basiconica or grooved pegs (types I, II, and III), and sensilla coeloconica (large and small), were observed on the female antennae of the eight species. The greatest number of sensilla found along the flagellum of all the Anopheles species consisted of sensilla trichodea. Grooved pegs type II were not found on the antennae of An. peditaeniatus. Interestingly, clusters of 10–15 grooved pegs type III, with blunt-tipped and unevenly grooved-lengthwise sensilla, and a sunken group of 7–12 grooved pegs type III, with slightly curved and point-tipped sensilla, were found distally on flagellomeres 3–7 of An. argyropus and An. peditaeniatus, respectively. In addition, the key for species identification, based on fine structure and morphometrics of antennal sensilla among the eight species, was constructed and differentiated successfully. However, in order to focus intensively on the exact function of these sensilla, further electrophysiological study is needed in understanding their significant role in mosquito behavior, especially when these insects seek hosts for transmitting pathogens to humans.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84991712941&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/56631
ISSN: 14321955
09320113
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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