Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/54709
Title: Associations between pregnancy outcomes and unexplained high and low maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein levels
Authors: Pongsun Puntachai
Chanane Wanapirak
Supatra Sirichotiyakul
Fuanglada Tongprasert
Kasemsri Srisupundit
Suchaya Luewan
Kuntharee Traisrisilp
Theera Tongsong
Keywords: Medicine
Issue Date: 18-Jul-2015
Abstract: © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Objective: To determine the relationship between adverse pregnancy outcomes and maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) levels. Materials and methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive singleton pregnancies, screened for fetal Down syndrome, in the northern part of Thailand. The prospective database of our fetal Down screening program was assessed to recruit all consecutive records. Pregnancies with medical complication and fetal abnormality were excluded. The recruited women were categorized into three groups: normal (≥0.76 to ≤2.0 MoM), low (<0.76 MoM) and high (>2.0 MoM) MSAFP levels. Results: Of 7,110 screened women, 5,486 met inclusion criteria, including 240; 5,016 and 230 in the group of high, normal and low MSAFP levels, respectively. The rates of preterm birth, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), fetal growth restriction (FGR), fetal death, low birth weight (LBW) and low APGAR scores were significantly higher in women with high MSAFP levels (11.7 vs. 6.6 %, 7.5 vs. 3.3 %, 7.5 vs. 3.3 %, 2.1 vs. 0.3 %, 15.8 vs. 6.7 %, and 2.9 vs. 0.5 % respectively), with relative risk of 1.76, 2.28, 2.27, 7.46, 2.35 and 6.09, respectively. The rates of preterm birth, FGR and LBW were significantly lower in low MSAFP levels with relative risk of 0.39, 0.26 and 0.26, respectively, whereas the rates of PIH and fetal death and low Apgar scores were not significantly different. Conclusions: Pregnant women with high MSAFP levels had an increased risk of poor pregnancy outcomes, while those with low MSAFP levels had a significantly lower risk of such outcomes.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84939957335&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/54709
ISSN: 14320711
09320067
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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