Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/53869
Title: A longitudinal examination of mothers' and fathers' social information processing biases and harsh discipline in nine countries
Authors: Jennifer E. Lansford
Darren Woodlief
Patrick S. Malone
Paul Oburu
Concetta Pastorelli
Ann T. Skinner
Emma Sorbring
Sombat Tapanya
Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado
Arnaldo Zelli
Suha M. Al-Hassan
Liane Peña Alampay
Dario Bacchini
Anna Silvia Bombi
Marc H. Bornstein
Lei Chang
Kirby Deater-Deckard
Laura Di Giunta
Kenneth A. Dodge
Keywords: Medicine
Psychology
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2014
Abstract: This study examined whether parents' social information processing was related to their subsequent reports of their harsh discipline. Interviews were conducted with mothers (n = 1,277) and fathers (n = 1,030) of children in 1,297 families in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States), initially when children were 7 to 9 years old and again 1 year later. Structural equation models showed that parents' positive evaluations of aggressive responses to hypothetical childrearing vignettes at Time 1 predicted parents' self-reported harsh physical and nonphysical discipline at Time 2. This link was consistent across mothers and fathers, and across the nine countries, providing support for the universality of the link between positive evaluations of harsh discipline and parents' aggressive behavior toward children. The results suggest that international efforts to eliminate violence toward children could target parents' beliefs about the acceptability and advisability of using harsh physical and nonphysical forms of discipline. © Cambridge University Press 2014.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84904855611&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/53869
ISSN: 14692198
09545794
Appears in Collections:CMUL: Journal Articles

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