Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/38101
Title: Effects of pilates training on lumbo-pelvic stability and flexibility
Authors: Phrompaet,S.
Paungmali,A.
Pirunsan,U.
Sitilertpisan,P.
Keywords: Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Issue Date: 1-Aug-2011
Publisher: Teheran University of Medical Sciences
Abstract: Purpose: This study was performed to assess and compare the effects of Pilates exercise on flexibility and lumbo-pelvic movement control between the Pilates training and control groups. Methods: A randomized single-blinded controlled design was utilized in the study. Forty healthy male and female volunteers (mean age 31.65 ± 6.21 years) were randomly divided into Pilates-based training (20 subjects) and the control groups (20 subjects). The Pilates group attended 45-minute training sessions, 2 times per week, for a period of 8 weeks. Flexibility and lumbo-pelvic stability tests were determined as outcome measures using a standard "sit and reach test" and "pressure biofeedback" respectively at 0, 4 and 8 weeks of the study. Results: The results showed that the Pilates training group improved flexibility significantly (P<0.001) during time intervals. This effect was also significantly greater than the control group for both 4 weeks and 8 weeks of the training period (P<0.001). There were 65% and 85% of the subjects from Pilates group passing the lumbo-pelvic stability test at 4 and 8 weeks of training periods respectively. No subjects from the control group passed the test at any stages. Conclusions: Pilates can be used as an adjunctive exercise program to improve flexibility, enhance control-mobility of trunk and pelvic segments. It may also prevent and attenuate the predisposition to axial musculoskeletal injury. © 2011 by Sports Medicine Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, All rights reserved.
URI: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84859432447&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/handle/6653943832/38101
ISSN: 2008000X
Appears in Collections:AMS: Journal Articles

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