Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/jspui/handle/6653943832/38025
Title: Polymorphisms in the bovine HSP90AB1 gene are associated with heat tolerance in Thai indigenous cattle
Authors: Charoensook,R.
Gatphayak,K.
Sharifi,A.R.
Chaisongkram,C.
Brenig,B.B.
Knorr,C.
Keywords: Animal Science and Zoology
Food Animals
Issue Date: 1-Apr-2012
Publisher: Springer Netherlands
Abstract: Heat shock proteins act as molecular chaperones that have preferentially been transcribed in response to severe perturbations of the cellular homeostasis such as heat stress. Here the traits respiration rate (RR), rectal temperature (RT), pack cell volume (PCV) and the individual heat tolerance coefficient (HTC) were recorded as physiological responses on heat stress (environmental temperatures) in Bos taurus (crossbred Holstein Friesian; HF) and B. indicus (Thai native cattle: White Lamphun; WL and Mountain cattle; MT) animals (n = 47) in Thailand. Polymorphisms of the heat shock protein 90-kDa beta gene (HSP90AB1) were evaluated by comparative sequencing. Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified, i. e. three in exons 10 and 11, five in introns 8, 9, 10 and 11, and one in the 3′UTR. The exon 11 SNP g. 5082C>T led to a missense mutation (alanine to valine). During the period of extreme heat (in the afternoon) RR and RT were elevated in each of the three breeds, whereas the PCV decreased. Mountain cattle and White Lamphun heifers recorded significantly better physiologic parameters (p < 0.05) in all traits considered, including or particularly HTC than Holstein Friesian heifers. The association analysis revealed that the T allele at SNP g. 4338T>C within intron 3 improved the heat tolerance (p < 0.05). Allele T was exclusively found in White Lamphun animals and to 84% in Mountain cattle. Holstein Friesian heifers revealed an allele frequency of only 18%. Polymorphisms within HSP90AB1 were not causative for the physiological responses; however, we propose that they should at least be used as genetic markers to select appropriate breeds for hot climates. © 2011 The Author(s).
URI: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84857691551&origin=inward
http://cmuir.cmu.ac.th/handle/6653943832/38025
ISSN: 00494747
Appears in Collections:AGRI: Journal Articles

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